Ballgown Construction, part 1

It’s been a while since my last post, but I’m determined to keep up with my New Year’s resolution. If you’ve followed me on Facebook, you might have seen that my Dove top (from Megan Nielsen designs) was featured on the Sewing Pattern Review blog. It made my day when to receive an email saying my top had been featured!

I spent quite a bit of last month knitting. I can’t share any pics yet, but the pattern should be published soon, and I’ll post once the pictures are up.

Moving on to the day’s topic, back in February I was persuaded to join a “Red Carpet Worthy Dress” sew-along group on Facebook. The pattern in question is Vogue 1533.

pattern_envelope_sm

It has a 2-layered “foundation,” which consists of a “foundation lining” (inner layer with boning), and an outer layer that closes with hook and eye tape. It extends from the neckline to just below the waist. In addition, the dress is fully lined. If you are inspired to give the pattern a try, note that many things are called “lining” in the instructions. All fabrics that are NOT the outermost “fashion” fabric are called “lining.” The full lining of the dress is called “lining,” and both layers of the foundation are made of “lining,” of which one layer is the “foundation lining.” Clear as mud, right?

I began by making a muslin of the foundation, which is a basic princess-seamed bodice that closes in the right side seam, and has a hanging thing on the left side. The princess seams had a little too much fabric over the full bust area, so I pinched it out with pins (left picture), and restitched the seam line (right).

I started dreaming of what my ideal fabric would be. I told my mom and husband (I have 2 witnesses here!) that I imagined a black fabric with white or silver flowers as the main dress fabric, and the front contrast panel in black. A week or so later, when browsing the Mood fabrics website, I found the fabric of my dreams. It was even reversible, so I could waffle at the last minute to decide if I want black with white/ silver flowers, or silver/ white with black flowers. Needless to say, I made the purchase.

I then purchased “lining” fabric for the foundation. It is a thin polyester satin, just a bit lighter than a crepe-backed satin (but thicker than the polyester stuff marketed as “lining”). I found a heavier satin for the front contrast panel. Here they are, left and right, respectively.

I started by constructing the foundation. The pattern calls for interfacing both layers. I used a lightweight interfacing for the “foundation” (left), and a much stiffer shirt-weight interfacing for the “foundation lining” (right), which eventually will receive boning. The wrong (gluey) side of each interfacing is shown in the left side of each picture.

I transferred the pattern adjustments to the pattern pieces, and cut and stitched the foundation. The right and wrong sides are shown below.

For the “foundation lining,” I cut the interfacing out of the princess seam allowances for the center and side-front panels. From past experience, I knew the interfacing would be too stiff to ease the curved pieces. I did have to additionally clip the princess seam allowances in a couple of places to keep the fabric lying flat, but otherwise this attempt went smoothly.

The shiny satin displays all flaws in the sewing in their full glory, as well as flaws that don’t exist. The princess seams really don’t have any tucks, despite appearances. After constructing the foundation layers, I was glad that I did not choose a shiny satin for the main fabric.

Here’s the foundation lining pinned into place. I ended up taking a ¼” out of the side seams of both layers near the top.

foundation_lining_unboned_sm

Up next is ordering and installing the hook and eye tape (I have white tape on hand, but want black for this job). I will also order boning. The foundation calls for something like 13 pieces of boning, which is nearly double of my “usual” amount (not that I’m “usually” making strapless dresses). I’ve decided to use steel spiral boning rather than the featherlight plastic boning I have on hand. The steel spiral boning affords more flexibility than the plastic stuff, and I’ve already found the plastic boning too constricting when used in only half the quantity called for here. Once that’s done, I’ll take a long sewing break to  trace and transfer adjustments onto all the other pattern pieces.

Meanwhile, if anyone knows of any upcoming balls, please send along an invitation. I will soon have a ballgown, with no ball to attend. I’m also happy to lend this to a Cinderella with the opposite problem, though she’d have to be exactly my size for the dress to fit. Any and all Cinderella/ ball pairing recommendations are most welcome.

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