Adventures with rayon

The McCall’s company had a sale on out of print patterns recently, and I picked up 3 at the time. Vogue 8961 was not one that I would have ordinarily paid much attention to, but it seemed like the perfect pattern for a rayon challis that my mom gave me for my birthday in January. The pattern was marked “very easy,” so I decided to give it a try, and to live dangerously and skip making a muslin. I did note that the V neck was quite deep, so I raised the point of the V by 1.5” to make it sit about 6.5” below the shoulder line, which is my preferred neck depth. This meant having to re-draft the neck facing as well.

V8961full3_sm

Because the fabric frayed like crazy (I seem to have forgotten my experience with rayon challis while making my  Garden Party Dress), I French-seamed from the outset. Usually I prefer to do mock French seams after all the construction is complete and I’ve tried on the garment for fit, since I like to have the seam allowances available for adjustments. But this garment was so large that I was sure I wouldn’t have to let it out anywhere. So that was Part 2 of living dangerously. Here’s a French seam—could be narrower, but it doesn’t matter so much since the top is roomy, and it does the trick of encasing the raw edges.

V8961_french_seam_sm

Although the construction was straightforward, as advertised, the rayon made it a challenge. The directions for the waist casing for the elastic were simply to stitch the edges of the seam allowances together. However, the fabric frayed so much that the stitches ripped right out as I tried to insert the elastic. So I unpicked the stitches, opened up the seam allowances, and fused a strip of very lightweight interfacing. Inspired by a recent Craftsy class on corsetry, I stitched a ribbon on top of the seam allowance to form the elastic casing. The ribbon came with a Bed, Bath, and Beyond wedding gift 5 years ago!

V8961_waist_casing_sm

Once that problem was solved, it was time to hem the piece. This is what the sleeve hem looked like after doing a tiny double-fold hem and hand-stitching. I commented that it looked like a parsley leaf.

V8691_sleeve_unpressed_sm

One redeeming feature of this fabric is that it presses well. Here’s the sleeve after a careful pressing. It’s not perfect, but it’s a vast improvement over the original. I’d decided not to be too fussy about this piece, so the sleeve hems did not receive any further adjustments.

V8961_sleeve_pressed_sm

I cut this tunic a bit shorter than called for, which is unusual for me since I usually lengthen tops (for personal preference, not because I’m uncommonly tall). I also stitched the entire shoulder seam, instead of leaving a gap as instructed. Overall, this was a great pattern to learn the joys and pitfalls of working with rayon. The next rayon project I have in mind will require a lot more precision in sewing, so I’m glad I had a “dress rehearsal” with this pattern.

V8961back2_sm

All that being said, I’m not sure this style is my thing. I’m not thrilled with the excess fabric in the back, though it may not hang properly without it. The tunic may grow on me, though, as the high-waisted skirt from a few weeks ago did after I wore it for a full day. Now I’m just waiting for spring weather to wear this one!

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2 thoughts on “Adventures with rayon

    1. Ashwini J Designs Post author

      Thank you! I think I just need to experiment with different pants/ skirts to find a styling that works well. I haven’t yet tried it with the pants that it was intended for, a “cigarette” style pant that I made long ago still wear often. The rayon was definitely the ideal fabric for this pattern, so I’m pleased with the fabric-pattern match this time.

      Reply

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