Polar vortex antidote

We had a bit of a teaser with 70 degree days in February, but winter wasn’t going to be usurped so easily, and it returned in full force earlier this month. The theme for this year seems to be that there will be a polar vortex whenever I have theater tickets. The first instance occurred in December, at which point I decided to invest in a long, heavy skirt that I could wear with tights and boots, which would keep me warm and still be appropriate for the theater. I chose the Burda 105 pattern, and a velvet fabric I picked up at Mood Fabrics in NYC (a gift from my husband). My second polar vortex encounter occurred at the beginning of the month, which strengthened my resolve to get this skirt done.

The velvet turned out to be heavy, slithery, and unstable—but so beautiful! Every seam of this skirt was arduous. Instead of chronicling the whole process, I’ll share one of the more brain-teasing aspects of it—putting in the invisible zipper. Here I’ve hand-basted the zipper line:

zip_line_WS_sm

However, the velvet was far too unstable to support a zipper. I stitched twill tape to the zipper seam allowance to stabilize it:

zip_line_twill-tape_sm

I then opened and stitched the invisible zipper to one side of the skirt back:

zip_attached_1st_side_sm

At this stage, most tutorials instruct you to keep the zipper open, and pin the other side of the zipper to the opposite side of the back. Here’s how it looks:

zip_attached_2nd_side_open_sm

I then tried to close the zipper, and realized I’d gotten it twisted:

zip_twisted_sm

I attempted it again, with the same result. I decided to march to the beat of my own drummer, and pin the zipper in the closed position. Here it is aligned to the zipper line, and then pinned in place:

The key to pinning is to insert the pin as far away from the zipper teeth as possible in the zipper tape, while still being able to bring the tip of the pin up through the same zipper tape. This makes it possible to open the zipper after it has been pinned in place. I just move the pin head away from the fabric as far as possible, and slide the zipper pull behind it. Sometimes the pins can also rotate to be nearly parallel to the zipper teeth.

 

I then stitched the second side of the zipper—here it is all closed up and invisible:

zip_completed_sm

Here’s the almost-complete skirt:

I have to attach a hook and eye to the waistband, and hem the lower edge. Marking the hem took forever, because the bottom of the skirt is cut like a circle skirt, which means it stretched on the bias. The hem line is currently marked with a line of basting (hard to see in these pictures). I’m still debating the best way to hem it. I’m considering following advice from Threads Magazine to hand-stitch a strip of bias fabric at the hem line, turn up the raw edge of the skirt, and catch-stitch to the bias fabric. This will be hours of hand sewing, as the bottom circumference is quite large (due to it being a circle skirt), but the stability might be worth it in the end. Hopefully by next week this skirt will be ready to make its debut.

 

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